Home Tag "dishonesty"

Does Your Mind Have Fraud Protection?

So, have you ever been or have you ever known someone who has been a victim of fraud? You know, had their credit card number stolen or their bank account hacked or their social security number breached? It is all quite real and it is all quite unsettling. Now, have you heard the term “fake news”? Think about it – fake news is fraud as well, since in its reporting we are led to believe something is true that isn’t. This phenomena is quite real and it is quite unsettling. Now, have you ever taken something from work that is not yours or “padded” an expense report or “forgotten” some income on your tax return? These things are also fraud – they are quite real and they are quite unsettling. The bottom line is, fraud is everywhere and we as Christians can be victims of it and we can also perpetrate it. So, what do we do? How do we keep fraud from being a part of our lives

Should You Ever Befriend Dishonesty?

Sometimes you read a scripture and it makes you do a double-take, because it simply does not make sense. It then ought to become our responsibility to figure it out – to try and understand what the real message is. Such is the case with our theme text from Jesus’ parable of the unjust steward. Jesus seems to say ‘make friends for yourselves by means of dishonest wealth, so you can have it easy later.’ It sounds like Jesus is throwing integrity out the window along with honesty and accountability and replacing them with a situational ethics "it’s all about me" approach. Could this be? Stay with us as we look into this parable, its context, its meaning, and its lessons for us.

Should We be Friendly with Dishonesty?

Just because we may be called to serve God through Jesus, it doesn’t mean that we no longer have anything to do with the world around us. On the contrary, we are widely instructed to deal fairly and generously with the world around us. The question is what does that mean? On this program we will look at one of Jesus’ parables in which his lesson is, at first glance, not very clear. Is Jesus saying to be friends with – to join forces with - “the mammon of unrighteousness” or is his lesson entirely different? Stay with us as we study the issue and try to get its proper meaning.